Articles in Employment & Labor

SUMMER IS COMING: Massachusetts Compliance Requirements with Respect to Summer Internship Programs

Posted

For the Morse Employment Law Group, the arrival of spring is marked, not by the blooming of vernal flowers, but, rather, by the steady increase of inquiries related to summer interns. A summer internship program is often an important component of an employer’s annual business cycle: internships help connect an employer to its surrounding academic communities; internships can facilitate an Read More

Department of Labor Proposes New Interpretation of Joint Employer Status Under The Fair Labor Standards Act

Posted

On April 9, 2019, the United States Department of Labor (“DOL”) published a notice of proposed rulemaking (the “NPRM”) to amend its existing regulations regarding so-called “joint employer” status under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (the “FLSA” or the “Act”). The FLSA requires covered “employers” to pay nonexempt employees at least the federal minimum wage for all hours worked and overtime Read More

Equal Pay Day in Massachusetts: Are you in compliance?

Posted

April 2, 2019, is National Equal Pay Day – a date designated by the National Committee on Pay Equity to highlight inequities in wages between men and women. Equal Pay Day marks how far into the next calendar year the average American woman would have to work in order to make as much as the average American man made in the preceding Read More

A Primer to the Massachusetts Paid Family and Medical Leave Law

Posted

The Massachusetts Paid Family and Medical Leave Act (the “PFML”) represents a sweeping change to the landscape of employee benefits laws that affect Massachusetts employers. Under the PFML, as of January 2021, millions of Massachusetts workers will become eligible for up to 26 weeks of job-protected, paid family and medical leave, on an annual basis, through a public-sponsored insurance program. A new Read More

Essential updates for employers – from April 2019

Posted

April not only brings with it lighter evenings but also a number of employment changes that employers should be aware of and incorporate into HR policies to avoid any penalties or potential tribunal action against them. This year sees increases to the national minimum and national living wages, as well as an increase to the maximum compensatory award for unfair Read More

The scope of equality law was highlighted in recent case at Glasgow University

Posted

Brent Haywood successfully demonstrated that a group was unlawfully refused affiliation by the Glasgow University Students’ Representative Council without the need for a court case. In the field of human rights and equalities law, often the cases which grab the headlines are those where a judgement is delivered after a hard-fought legal battle in court. But the law doesn’t develop only Read More

The Deemed Export Rule: Balancing Requirements Under U.S. Export Control and Anti-Discrimination Laws

Posted

In a press release issued earlier this year, the Immigrant and Employee Rights Section of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that it reached a settlement agreement with Honda Aircraft Company, LLC (“Honda Aircraft”), resolving a claim that Honda Aircraft had violated the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) when, in an effort to comply with U.S. export control laws, Read More

Employers Facing New Rules on Overtime, Reporting Pay Data

Posted

Early March has come in like a lion for employers, who are now facing potential new federal rules on overtime and classification, as well as changes to how much information they need to be reporting to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission regarding pay rates broken down by gender and race. Labor Department Proposes Expanding Overtime Coverage The Department of Labor Read More

Illinois Biometric Policy Law Does Not Require Proof of Actual Damages

Posted

Attention businesses operating in Illinois: If you use a person’s “biometric” data for things like timekeeping or security, you must have a written policy under which you: (1) obtain written consent, (2) store the data confidentially and (3) destroy the data no later than three years after the last interaction with the person. If you fail to do so, you face statutory penalties Read More

Are Ubers drivers considered to be workers?

Posted

urther to our previous articles on the Uber case (Aslam, Farrar & Others v Uber), the Court of Appeal has considered on appeal whether Uber drivers are workers (rather than self-employed) and entitled to basic employment rights. The judgment was published on 19 December 2018. Background With the growing number of varied working arrangements being used by employers, clarifying whether someone is Read More